Those aren’t weeds, they’re dandelions!

Screen shot 2014-05-17 at 9.41.39 PM

My “serious weed problem”.

The other day my doorbell rang.

When I answered the door, I saw a gentleman standing on my porch. He seemed eager to greet me.

“Hello, sir, I am a representative from TruGreen lawn care services.”

“Ok,” I replied, gesturing for him to begin his well-rehearsed sales pitch on the latest fertilizers and lawn chemicals.

“I see that you have a serious weed problem in your lawn”, he remarked.

“Oh, those aren’t weeds, they’re dandelions, and I think they’re beautiful,” I told him. “Just look at how yellow and pretty they are.”

“Are you serious?” he asked me.

“Yeah, I’m serious. And if I could plant more in my yard I would.”

Not knowing what to make of my comments, the salesman, who had initially approached me with much confidence in his arsenal of anti-weed products, now seemed perplexed.

And just as quickly as he appeared on my porch, he wished me a good day, turned around, and walked away.

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10 Responses to “Those aren’t weeds, they’re dandelions!”


  1. 1 dradrea May 15, 2014 at 11:55 am

    Dandelions get such a bad rap…

  2. 3 susquehannarambler2 May 15, 2014 at 12:48 pm

    I love dandelions. I love seeing fields of them and I make medicine from them and sometimes wine.

  3. 5 walktx May 15, 2014 at 2:05 pm

    Dandelions are good for your lawn. Their wide-spreading roots loosen hard-packed soil, aerate the earth and help reduce erosion. The deep taproot pulls nutrients such as calcium from deep in the soil and makes them available to other plants. Dandelions actually fertilize the grass.

  4. 7 leifhendrik May 15, 2014 at 3:32 pm

    A herbalogist friend of mine makes dandelion fritters. But so many people seem absolutely terrified of dandelions, as if they will take over the world unless they are immediately exterminated. I prefer your approach.

  5. 8 Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert May 17, 2014 at 10:01 pm

    Thanks, leifhendrik! Wow, dandelion fritters sound awesome! I agree, a lot of people seem terrified and absolutely annoyed by them.

  6. 9 Roma June 17, 2014 at 9:15 am

    My grandpa cooked dandelions for us when he used to live with us down in the valley. He took off the flower part, boiled them down (which seemed to take a little while), strained them and added them to fried bacon and onions. They were good. Reminded me of spinach. Enjoy!


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Copyright Notice

© Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

About the author

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert is enrolled with the Hopi Tribe from the village of Upper Moencopi in northeastern Arizona. He is an associate professor of American Indian Studies & History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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A Second Wave of Hopi Migration (History of Education Quarterly, August 2014)

Sun Chief: An Autobiography of A Hopi Indian by Don C. Talayesva, New foreword by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Sept. 2013)

Marathoner Louis Tewanima and the Continuity of Hopi Running, 1908-1912 (Western Historical Quarterly, Autumn 2012). Winner of Spur Award for Best Western Short Nonfiction, Western Writers of America (2013)

“Hopi Footraces and American Marathons, 1912-1930″, American Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1, March Issue 2010 (Click image to download article)

Hopi runner Philip Zeyouma’s trophy cups featured on cover of American Quarterly

Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929 (University of Nebraska Press, 2010)

Education beyond the Mesas – Introduction (click image to download)

“‘The Hopi Followers': Chief Tawaquaptewa and Hopi Student Advancement at Sherman Institute, 1906-1909″, Journal of American Indian Education, (Click image to download article)

The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue: Voices and Images From Sherman Institute (Oregon State University Press, 2012)

Arizona English Teachers Association highlights Hopi authors (click image to download)

Constitution and Bylaws of the Hopi Tribe (With all amendments, click to download)

Click to listen to KUYI On-Line

Matt’s Goodreads

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