Archive for the 'Hopi news of interest' Category

Hopi Footprints of the Ancestors: Film Premiere and Discussion with Hopi Youth and Elders

Hopi scholars publish articles

I am pleased to report that Hopi scholars Sheilah E. Nicholas of the University of Arizona and Lomayumtewa C. Ishii of Northern Arizona University recently published the following articles:

Nicholas, Sheilah E., “Language, Epistemology, and Cultural Identity: ‘Hopiqatsit Aw Unanguakiwyungwa‘ (‘They Have Their Heart in the Hopi Way of Life’)”, American Indian Culture and Research Journal, 2010, Vol. 34, No. 2, pp. 125-144.

This article provides an in-depth “on the ground” look at the Hopi language shift—“becoming accustomed to speaking English”—through the lenses of the study participants who represent the youth, parent, and grandparent generations. The article also gives attention to Hopi oral tradition and the Hopi identity-formation process in order to articulate the link among language, epistemology, and identity, spotlighting what of the traditions, practices, and religion remain salient and why they remain salient. [p. 127]

Ishii, Lomayumtewa C., “Western Science Comes to the Hopis: Critically Deconstructing the Origins of an Imperialist Canon,” Wicazo Sa Review, Fall 2010, Vol. 24, No. 2, pp. 65-88.

The number of western texts written about Hopi culture is enormous. The work of Jesse Walter Fewkes, beginning in the 1890s, marks a key starting point in the articulation of a western perspective of Hopi culture, initiating a canon rooted in nineteenth-century anthropological thought. Fewkes’s work also illustrates how the establishment of a “cultural archive” was pragmatically related to his research, which included excavations of Hopi sites (notably the village of Awatovi), as well as through his personal commentary. This article examines nineteenth-century anthropological theory, Fewkes’s employment of that theoretical orientation, and how his work established the foundation of a “cultural archive” that constitutes a canon in the study of Hopi culture. But more importantly, by critically reading these texts a decolonization process reveals a western imperialistic mind at work. [p. 65]

Hopi High Cross Country Team Wins 21st Straight State Championship

I want to congratulate our Hopi High boys cross country team for winning their 21st straight Class 2A State Championship. This is a remarkable achievement. In an article in The Arizona Republic, reporter Jose M. Romero noted that Hopi runner Justin Secakuku won the Division IV meet for the team yesterday in Phoenix, Arizona. Congratulations to the Hopi High runners and their coaches for once again bringing honors to our people. Be sure to check out the following link for more information about this story: http://www.azcentral.com/sports/preps/articles/2010/11/06/20101106hopi-boys-cross-country-titles.html

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Navajo-Hopi Observer reports that Homolovi Ruins State Park will reopen

Photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

On October 27, 2010, the Navajo-Hopi Observer (NHO) reported that the “Hopi Tribal Council approved a resolution that will keep the Homolovi Ruins Historic Park opened, which will allow safeguard and protection of the cultural and religious site.” State officials closed the Park in February 2010 to help alleviate Arizona’s budget deficit. According to the report in the NHO, the Hopi Tribe has agreed to contribute $175,000 to subsidize the Park’s operating costs.  To learn more about this important development, please visit the following website: http://www.navajohopiobserver.com/main.asp?SectionID=1&SubSectionID=1&ArticleID=12970

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Hopi educator Sahmie Sunshine Wytewa NIEA board of directors candidate

Sahmie Sunshine Wytewa, 2010 NIEA Board of Directors candidate

I am pleased to announce that Sahmie Sunshine Wytewa, an enrolled member of the Hopi Tribe and lifelong educator, is an official candidate for the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) board of directors.  Wytewa comes to the NIEA with an incredible amount of experience, a passion for the advancement of Indian education, a close connection to the Hopi community, and an impeccable work ethic. NIEA members will have the opportunity to vote for candidates at the upcoming NIEA Convention held in San Diego, California, on October 7-10, 2010. Below is Wytewa’s personal statement on the NIEA website: http://www.niea.org/events/board.php

Sahmie Sunshine Wytewa, Hopi: Ms. Wytewa is a prime candidate for NIEA board membership given her strengths as a practicing educator, educational background, and her strong desire to provide leadership in education. In addition to her professional qualities, she is also an involved community member of the Hopi tribe who has endured the challenges of balancing her culture and educational pursuits. As a mother, Sahmie has taken great care in providing the experiences of traditional values and real-life expectations for her children.

As an educator, Ms. Wytewa understands the significance of accountability in academic achievement and the inequalities that are reflected in the quality of education and misrepresentation of Native populations in regards to academic performance. Working in underperforming schools going through School Improvement, she has the working knowledge of current initiatives in educational reform. Her skills as a teacher have allowed her firsthand insight into the trends in achievement, learning modes of children, and research-based strategies that promote academic growth.

Ms. Wytewa’s continued professional growth is the direct result of her desire to improve the quality of education and learning experiences for all students. Channeling her efforts to further develop reform in Indian education, Sahmie has chosen the course of advancement through leadership. She is committed to working in collaboration with like-minded individuals or groups towards student-centered reform.

With strong ties to her community, Sahmie has an authentic link giving her the advantage of providing background in an otherwise vague theme of Indian education. It is with these combined strengths and efforts, that Ms. Wytewa can be a true asset to the NIEA board in providing many perspectives of education.

Hopi radio KUYI 88.1 FM live stream

Photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Last weekend I attended the 77th Annual Hopi Show at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff and spoke with volunteer DJ “Jimbo” (pictured on the left) and Richard Alun Davis (pictured in the center), Station Manager for KUYI 88.1 FM, the official radio station of the Hopi Tribe. They informed me that the radio station is now being transmitted via a live stream on the internet.

In addition to playing a variety of music from rock-n-roll, reggae, country western, and religious selections, KUYI is committed to  broadcasting programs in the Hopi language. Other programs focus on Hopi health, education, farming, and youth.

When I spoke with Davis at the Hopi Show, I asked him if KUYI would be willing to transmit the audio of Beyond the Mesas. He seemed very interested in the idea. Once we finalize the details, I will make an announcement on my blog.

To listen to the live stream of KUYI, please click on the following link: http://www.kuyi.net/listen-online

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

Hopi Show at Museum of Northern Arizona

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Since the 1930s, more than 60 artists have come together each year to sell and demonstrate their art to the public at the annual Hopi Show.  Held on the 4th of July weekend at the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff, the Hopi Show attracts thousands of visitors from around the world to witness and experience authentic Hopi art, dance, music, and food.

In addition to the artists, several vendors and Hopi organizations such as the Hopi Education Endowment Fund, the Hopi Foundation, and the Black Mesa Trust participate in the event. The show organizers also provide special activities for children, including crafts, ceramics, and an exhibit where kids learn to grind corn and make piki (paper-thin bread) according to the Hopi way.

The above slideshow consists of photographs that I took at the 76th Hopi Show in 2009. This year, the Hopi Show will take place July 3-4. For more information, please click on the following link: http://www.nativeart.net/nativeamericanartshow/indianmarket/hopi-festival-of-arts-and-culture-2010-j0zij5.php

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

A classical guitarist from Kykotsmovi

When I was younger I studied classical guitar with Tom Sheeley at Northern Arizona University. I had dreams of becoming a professional Spanish classical guitarist, but that aspiration never came to be. Below is an article about a sixteen year old Hopi guitarist named Malcolm Mowa from Kykotsmovi. One of his compositions titled “Aerial Ice” was recently aired on National Public Radio. I am looking forward to hearing more about this Hopi musician in the future.

The story and photo are courtesy of Stan Bindell and the Navajo-Hopi Observer (NHO). Many thanks to Wells Mahkee Jr., Managing Editor of NHO, for granting me permission to republish this story on my blog. Here is the link to the original source: http://navajohopiobserver.com/main.asp?SectionID=74&subsectionID=111&articleID=12247

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

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Hopi student’s music hits national airwaves

Stan Bindell, The Observer

Tuesday, February 02, 2010

POLACCA, Ariz. – A Hopi High School music student has hit the national airwaves. Malcolm Mowa had his musical composition, “Aerial Ice,” performed on National Public Radio. He wrote the piece, which was performed by Ethel, a four-string quartet.

Mowa, a 16-year old junior, said Ethel performed great and he was excited about having his piece aired nationally. He initially wrote the piece as part of the Grand Canyon Music Festival when artist in residence Raven Chacone came to Hopi High and taught six students how to compose.

Mowa learned about his piece being aired nationally when it was announced over the school’s intercom. “It motivates me to want to do more with music,” he said.

“I want to go to school for music composition and guitar.” He also wants to learn to play the piano. Mowa said his parents were excited and happy about his composition being aired nationally.

“Everybody wants to hear it, but nobody knows when it was played,” he said. Thomas Irwin, band teacher at Hopi High, was equally ecstatic about Mowa’s piece getting national airtime.

“It was great, cool,” he said. “There are new people at NPR working on programming.”

The new programming allows the top high school students from throughout the nation to have their pieces aired. One of Irwin’s former students at Monument Valley High School received a $10,000 endowment for his work.

Irwin said he hopes Mowa stays serious about his musical work because he can major in guitar or composition, and scholarships are available to him.

“I’m confident he can get scholarships,” Irwin said. “He’s a great example of what can happen when kids apply themselves. Chances are we’ll get more success stories.”

Irwin said Mowa’s fellow students were happy for him, although some teased him about his success.

Mowa said “Aerial Ice” was a happy tune about how he felt at the time. It’s classical music and it’s just instrumental; there are no words. He added that he likes classical music better than hip hop or rap.

“It’s better than a lot of the music that’s out there. It’s mellow, nice – not bad stuff,” he said.

Mowa likes alternative rock, classic rock and pop music.

Mowa is also part of the Hopi High guitar class, which recently performed at the Hopi Cultural Center and other places in the community.

“It was weird because we were playing off to the side while people were eating, but people were happy we were playing. They would put down their food and listen,” he said. Mowa, who also plays baseball, maintains a B average and hopes to get a music scholarship to college. He is the son of Uberta and Clifton Mowa from Kykotsmovi.

Navajo-Hopi Observer

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Hopi professor earns tenure and promotion

It gives me great pleasure to announce that Hopi professor Angela A. Gonzales from Shungopavi on Second Mesa has received tenure and promotion to Associate Professor at Cornell University. This truly is an incredible accomplishment. Gonzales received her undergraduate degree from UC Riverside and her MA, EdM, and PhD in Sociology form Harvard University. Her first academic post was at San Francisco State University where she served as an assistant professor and acting chair of American Indian Studies from 1997 to 2000. In 2002 she joined the faculty in the Department of Development Sociology at Cornell where she also teaches in the American Indian Program. As an assistant professor Gonzales has had a prolific and remarkable career.

In addition to publishing chapters in many books, her articles have appeared in the Social Sciences Journal, the Public Historian, the American Indian Culture and Research Journal, and the International Social Sciences Journal. Alongside her faculty appointments, she was the director of the Hopi Tribe Grants and Scholarship Program on the Hopi Reservation from 1994 to 1995, and from 2005 to 2007 she held a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado at Denver Health Sciences Center, Native Elder Research Center, and the American Indian and Alaska Native Program.

In 2009 she was awarded the Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowship for her project titled “Racializing American Indians: The Politics of Identity, Displacement, and Dispossession.” Gonzales’ tenure and promotion is a proud moment for Hopi people. She is only one of a few Hopi professors in the academy with indefinite tenure.

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Hopi Tribe has new chairman

Earlier this month LeRoy Shingoitewa from Upper Moencopi was sworn in as the new chairman of the Hopi Tribe. Chairman Shingoitewa has a long history of promoting education among Hopi and non-Hopi people. Throughout his career he has served as the principal for Kinsey Elementary School in the mountain community of Flagstaff, Arizona, Moencopi Day School, and the Tuba City High School. Herman Honanie from Kykotsmovi was elected to be the Vice Chairman.

According to a recent report in the Navajo-Hopi Observer, Chairman Shingoitewa and Vice Chairman Honanie will be revisiting the passing of last month’s budget that eliminated funding for the Hopi Tutuveni. When asked in a public forum about the closure of the Hopi paper, Chairman Shingoitewa said: “Vice Chairman Honanie and I will be looking at the entire 2010 budget that was approved recently. Many of these budget decisions will need a second [visit] and the Tutuveni is only one of the areas we will take a second look at.” To read the entire story in the Navajo-Hopi Observer, click here.

[Chairman Shingoitewa's father, Samuel Shingoitewa, attended Sherman Institute in the 1920s. In 2004, I had the priviledge of interviewing Samuel at his home for my book on the Hopi boarding school experience at Sherman.]


Copyright Notice

© Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS, 2009-2014. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

About the author

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert is enrolled with the Hopi Tribe from the village of Upper Moencopi in northeastern Arizona. He is an associate professor of American Indian Studies & History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Sun Chief: An Autobiography of A Hopi Indian by Don C. Talayesva, New foreword by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Sept. 2013)

Marathoner Louis Tewanima and the Continuity of Hopi Running, 1908-1912 (Western Historical Quarterly, Autumn 2012). Winner of Spur Award for Best Western Short Nonfiction, Western Writers of America (2013)

“Hopi Footraces and American Marathons, 1912-1930″, American Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1, March Issue 2010 (Click image to download article)

Hopi runner Philip Zeyouma’s trophy cups featured on cover of American Quarterly

Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929 (University of Nebraska Press, 2010)

Education beyond the Mesas – Introduction (click image to download)

“‘The Hopi Followers’: Chief Tawaquaptewa and Hopi Student Advancement at Sherman Institute, 1906-1909″, Journal of American Indian Education, (Click image to download article)

The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue: Voices and Images From Sherman Institute (Oregon State University Press, 2012)

Arizona English Teachers Association highlights Hopi authors (click image to download)

Constitution and Bylaws of the Hopi Tribe (With all amendments, click to download)

Click to listen to KUYI On-Line

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