Posts Tagged 'Indian education'

Hopi candidate Nikishna Polequaptewa for NIEA board

The following post was originally published on the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) website: http://niea.org/Convention/Board-Elections.aspx. NIEA board member elections will take place at the this year’s NIEA Convention & Tradeshow in Albuquerque, NM, October 26-30.

NIEA members can also vote by absentee ballot. Click here (scroll to the bottom of the page) for more information.

I have known Nikishna Polequaptewa for the past 4 years, and I have written about his accomplishments in a previous post. I have a lot of respect and appreciation for him and the work that he is doing with and for Native people.  NIEA and its members would be very fortunate to have Polequaptewa on the Board of Directors.

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

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2011 Board Nominee
Nikishna Polequaptewa
Hopi

“I envision a meaningful shift toward a higher percentage of college educated tribal administrators, dignitaries, business owners, operators, managers, and executives that will have the ability to make informed decisions that will promote Indian self-sufficiency and strengthen tribal sovereignty.”

NIKISHNA POLEQUAPTEWA is a devoted Hopi tribal member and Native education advocate. Through his innovative outreach and retention programs, he has set a standard of excellence for programs involving access, outreach, and retention to higher education for Native students across the country.

Nikishna’s commitment to education and academic achievement was evident long before he attended college. He was a participant in the California Baptist University’s University Bridge Program (1998- 1999), and then in the University of California‘s, Riverside’s High School-University Program the following year (1999- 2000). In 2000, he graduated as class president from Sherman Indian High School and continued his educational pursuits at the University of California, Irvine (UCI). While there, he continued to actively contribute to outreach and retention programs for American Indian students holding roles such as the American Indian Student Association President and Director of American Indian Summer Institute in Computer Science, a UCI American Indian academic resource program. He also reinstated and coordinated the UCI Pow Wow. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Analysis and Design with a minor in Information and Computer Science in 2005 from the University of California, Irvine.

Nikishna obtained his Master’s Degree from Central Washington University (CWU) with a Master’s of Science in the Resource Management Program in 2007. While at CWU, he served as a research assistant (2005- 2007) and as a Program Manager for the La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians (2007). That same year, he became founding Director of the American Indian Resource Program at the University of California, Irvine (2007).

Nikishna has earned several honors including: Special Congressional Recognition (through U.S. House of Representative Ken Calvert and U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer), the Presidential Recognition Award (through former President Bill Clinton), the Native American 40 Under 40 Award (2009); and has been successful in securing multiple grants for the American Indian Resource Program and other projects.

Nikishna holds numerous community and leadership positions in organizations such as the UCI Campuswide Climate Council, the American Indian Children’s Council, AISES Chapter (President), the University of California, American Indian Counselors and Recruiters Association (Chair), Nakwatsvewat Institute (Board Chairman), Chancellor’s Advisor Committee (Diversity Chair), and the American Indian Scholarship Fund (Vice Chair). He also holds national memberships in the American Indian Science & Engineering Society (Lifetime Sequoyah Fellow), Society for Advancement for Chicanos and Native Americans in Science, and the National Indian Education Association and holds state memberships in the California Alliance for Minority participation, Inter-tribal Colligate Alliance, the American Indian Chamber of Commerce, and the California Indian Education Association.

Source: http://niea.org/Convention/Board-Elections.aspx

Urban Indians in Phoenix Schools, 1940-2000 by Stephen Kent Amerman

Image courtesy of University of Nebraska Press

Stephen Kent Amerman, an associate professor of history at Southern Connecticut State University, has published a book entitled Urban Indians in Phoenix Schools, 1940-2000. His book is part of the Indigenous Education Series with the University of Nebraska Press. Various studies have been written on the educational experiences of American Indian people. However, much of this literature has tended to focus on the Indian boarding school experience during the so-called assimilation period. Recent studies, such as Taos/Dine scholar Glenabah Martinez’s monograph, Native Pride: The Politics of Curriculum and Instruction in an Urban Public School and Amerman’s book, fill a major gap in the literature on the experiences of Native students who attended public high schools. Amerman also writes about Hopis who went to Phoenix urban schools, which is a topic not often examined by scholars of Hopi and Indian education history. Below is a brief synopsis of the book from the University of Nebraska Press website.

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

In the latter half of the twentieth century, tens of thousands of Native American families moved to cities across the United States, some via the government relocation program and some on their own. In the cities, they encountered new forms of work, entertainment, housing, and education. In this study, Stephen Kent Amerman focuses on the educational experiences of Native students in urban schools in Phoenix, Arizona, a city with one of the largest urban Indian communities in the nation. The educational experiences of Native students in Phoenix varied over time and even in different parts of the city, but interactions with other ethnic groups and the experience of being a minority for the first time presented distinctive challenges and opportunities for Native students.
Using oral histories as well as written records, Amerman examines how Phoenix schools tried to educate and assimilate Native students alongside Hispanic, Asian, black, and white students and how Native children, their parents, and the Indian community at large responded to this new urban education and the question of their cultural identity. Reconciling these pressures was a struggle, but many found resourceful responses, charting paths that enabled them to acquire an urban education while still remaining Indian.
Stephen Kent Amerman is an associate professor of history at Southern Connecticut State University. His articles have appeared in American Indian Culture and Research Journal, American Indian Quarterly, and Journal of Arizona History.

Beyond the Mesas to air locally and via internet

I am pleased to announce that UI-7, a local television station associated with the College of Media at the University of Illinois, will air Beyond the Mesas this week on the following days and times:

Tuesday, January 19 – 7:30pm and 9:00pm CST
Wednesday, January 20 – 1:00 pm CST
Friday, January 22 – 10:00 pm CST
Saturday, January 23 – 8:00 pm CST

UI-7 can be seen on Channel 7 for local Comcast subscribers.

On the same days/times, Beyond the Mesas will air simultaneously over the internet via a live stream at: http://www.media.illinois.edu/service/ui7live.html

If you are planning on watching the film on-line, remember to account for the different time zones. The above showings are listed in Central Standard Time (CST)

Beyond the Mesas Trailer

About the film:

Directed by Emmy Award winning director, Allan Holzman, and produced by Leigh J. Kuwanwisiwma, Stewart B. Koyiyumptewa, Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert, and Gerald Eichner, Beyond the Mesas is a thirty-six minute documentary film on the removal of Hopis to on and off-reservation boarding schools and their experiences at schools such as Sherman Institute, Phoenix Indian School, Ganado Mission School, and Stewart Indian School. Topics covered in the film include Hopi understandings of education, early U.S. government attempts to assimilate Hopis, the Orayvi Split, Hopi language loss at American schools, and the future of the Hopi people. Produced with the cooperation and involvement of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office in Kykotsmovi, Arizona, Beyond the Mesas is part I of a series of films on children and American Indian culture titled “Keeping the Culture Alive.”

The first public showing of the film was at the Hotevilla Bacavi Community School on the Hopi Reservation on November 8, 2006. Shortly afterwards, the Applied Indigenous Studies Department at Northern Arizona University and the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office hosted a screening at the Cline Library auditorium. Since November 2006, official screenings have taken place at other universities and schools, including the University of Illinois, University of California, Riverside, Cornell University, and Sherman Indian High School. The film has aired on several regional PBS stations throughout the United States.

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

An organization to help Hopi students pursue an education

One of the organizations that the film producers acknowledged and thanked in Beyond the Mesas was the Hopi Education Endowment Fund (HEEF). In addition to providing funds to support educational research, HEEF has generated millions of dollars to help Hopi students receive an education on and off the reservation. I was one of these students, and I remain very thankful and indebted to HEEF and the Hopi Tribe Grants and Scholarship Program (HTGSP) for helping me to attend college and graduate school. I would not be where I am at today without the support of HEEF and the HTGSP. Below is a brief film about the organization’s purpose and goals. A reoccurring theme in the film is that many Hopis consider education to be a tool that will ensure the survival of our people. This understanding is key to HEEF’s existence. Please consider donating to this worthy organization. To learn more about HEEF, click here.


Copyright Notice

© Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS, 2009-2019. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

About the author

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Hopi) is Professor and Head of the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona.

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Revisiting the Hopi Boarding School Experience at Sherman Institute and the Process of Making Research Meaningful to Community (JAIE, 2018)

Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929 (University of Nebraska Press, 2010)

Introduction to Education beyond the Mesas (2010)

The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue: Voices and Images From Sherman Institute (Oregon State University Press, 2012)

Foreward to Don Talayesva’s Sun Chief: An Autobiography of A Hopi Indian (2013)

Foreword to Kevin Whalen’s Native Students at Work: American Indian Labor and Sherman Institute’s Outing Program, 1900-1945

A Second Wave of Hopi Migration (HEQ, 2014)

Marathoner Louis Tewanima and the Continuity of Hopi Running, 1908-1912 (WHQ, 2012). Winner of Spur Award for Best Western Short Nonfiction, Western Writers of America (2013)

Hopi Footraces and American Marathons, 1912-1930 (AQ, 2010)

The Hopi Followers: Chief Tawaquaptewa and Hopi Student Advancement at Sherman Institute, 1906-1909 (JAIE, 2005)

Constitution and Bylaws of the Hopi Tribe (With all amendments, click to download)

Click to listen to KUYI On-Line

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