Archive for the 'The Hopi Foundation' Category

PRESS RELEASE: Argentinian Doctor to Receive Hopi Award

Coordinator, Barbara Chester Award

BCAward@hopifoundation.org

barbarachesteraward.hopifoundation.org

You can learn more about the Hopi Foundation at www.hopifoundation.org 

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE         June 6, 2016

Contact

The Hopi Foundation

Email: bcaward@hopifoundation.org

Website: barbarachesteraward.org

Phone: (928) 734-2380

 Argentinian Doctor to Receive Hopi Award

Dr. Diana Kordon of Argentina will receive the 7th Barbara Chester Award for her clinical work healing survivors of torture.  For four decades, Kordon has provided psychological services to the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo and others affected by atrocities committed by the military dictatorship in her country.  She is currently the coordinator of the Argentine Team of Psychological Work and Research.  Presentation of the Award will occur on October 8, 2016 on the Hopi Indian Reservation in Arizona.

The Barbara Chester Award is the world’s first anti-torture award and is a project of the Hopi Foundation. It includes a $10,000 cash prize and a Hopi handcrafted silver eagle feather sculpture. These will be formally presented at the Saturday, October 8th event on the Hopi Reservation in northeastern Arizona. Previous recipients are Shari Eppel of Zimbabwe (2000), Juan Almendares of Honduras (2001), Allen Keller of New York (2003), Alp Ayan of Turkey (2006), Mary Fabri of Chicago (2009) and Dr. Naasson Munyandamutsa of Rwanda (2013).

During the “Dirty War” period from 1976 to 1983, Argentina’s military dictatorship killed between 10,000 and 30,000 citizens. “The situation was terrible,” Kordon recalled. “Professionals were disappearing. We had to move regularly. I was close to being arrested at one time.”

In her quest for information about her missing colleagues, Kordon soon met The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo, a group of women who had brought international attention to the plight of the Desaparecidos (citizens arrested and never seen again) through highly publicized weekly vigils.

“When these mothers learned about my profession they asked if I could offer psychological assistance because many of the members were experiencing depression,” Kordon recalls. With them, she created and coordinated the Equipo de Atención Psicológica a Madres de Plaza de Mayo (Team of Psychological Assistance to Mothers of Plaza de Mayo).

Dr. Nora Sveaass says Kordon was “among the first to identify the relationship between the violations perpetrated by the dictatorship and the traumatic effects that these violations had…not only on the affected individuals but on society at large. The establishment of EATIP (Equipo Argentino de Trabajo e Investigación Psicosocial) in 1990 represented a further strengthening and systematization of this important, pioneering work.”

The Barbara Chester Award is given as a tribute to honor the life and work of the late Dr. Barbara Chester, a pioneering clinician who directed the first treatment program for torture survivors in the United States. Later she treated indigenous refugees from Central and South America, as well as survivors from more than 50 countries. In particular, her work stressed the role of culture in determining both how an individual experienced the trauma of torture as well as the best approach for recovery.

How the world’s first anti-torture award came to be sponsored in a small and remote non-gaming Native American reservation is a story in itself.  About 18,000 Hopi people live in northeastern Arizona, the oldest continuously inhabited location in North America.  Given the remoteness of Hopi, their culture has survived largely intact in spite of focused efforts at forced assimilation. Based on her pioneering work establishing the Center for the Victims of Torture in Minneapolis, Dr. Chester was contracted by the Hopi Tribe and later moved to Arizona to work for the Hopi Foundation. After her death and to honor her work, The Hopi Foundation established and promotes The Barbara Chester Award.

Cities are seen as attracting diverse people who learn from each other and develop sophisticated and tolerant values. To an outsider, Hopi is merely a collection of 11 villages in a barren landscape with a culture substantially at variance with “modern” America.  The reservation seems an unlikely source of the first international prize given to clinicians who work with torture survivors, yet it is from this land, this culture and these people that a sophisticated network of tolerance and support has reached around the world.  The Hopi help humanity heal from the very worst that humans can do to each other.

Nikishna Polequaptewa, graduate of the Hopi Foundation’s Leadership Program states, “In Hopi, by integrating all aspects of life into balance with ourselves, the environment and our spiritual beliefs, the wellbeing of individuals, the local community, and the world as a whole is served.”

**Click here for official Press Release.

Applications sought for 2012-2013 Hopi Leadership Program

Please click here for the 2012-2013 Hopi Leadership Program application form (12 pages).

The Hopi Foundation 10-Day Cultures of Giving Online Donor Challenge

Click here for more information.

The Hopi Foundation 2011 Fall Newsletter

Click image to download newsletter (6 pages)

Hopi Organizations on Twitter and Facebook

[Updated April 1, 2011]

Below are three Hopi organizations that regularly use Twitter and Facebook. If you are familiar with other organizations, please let me know. I would like to update this list.

Hopi Education Endowment Fund (Twitter: http://twitter.com/HEEF / Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KUYIRadio?ref=ts)

KUYI 88.1 FM (Twitter: http://twitter.com/kuyi / Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hopi-Education-Endowment-Fund/108338002293?ref=ts

The Hopi Foundation (Twitter: http://twitter.com/Hopi_Foundation / Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HopiFoundation?ref=ts

Hopi Tutskwa Permaculture (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hopi-Tutskwa-Permaculture/152816334745755)

The Natwani Coalition (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Natwani-Coalition/186730393592)

HOPI Substance Abuse Prevention Center (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/HOPI-Substance-Abuse-Prevention-Center/169167022741

Owl and Panther: A Project of the Hopi Foundation (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Owl-and-Panther-A-Project-of-The-Hopi-Foundation/131986090172266

Three Mesas Productions (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Three-Mesas-Productions/111304518899326)

Hopi Leadership Program (Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hopi-Leadership-Program/126703504007198)

 

2010 Hopilavayi Forum – Hopilavayit Itam Qasuutokyani


Copyright Notice

© Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS, 2009-2016. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert and BEYOND THE MESAS with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

About the author

Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert is enrolled with the Hopi Tribe from the village of Upper Moencopi in northeastern Arizona. He is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and a Dean's Fellow and Conrad Humanities Scholar in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Sun Chief: An Autobiography of A Hopi Indian by Don C. Talayesva, New foreword by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert (Sept. 2013)

Marathoner Louis Tewanima and the Continuity of Hopi Running, 1908-1912 (Western Historical Quarterly, Autumn 2012). Winner of Spur Award for Best Western Short Nonfiction, Western Writers of America (2013)

“Hopi Footraces and American Marathons, 1912-1930”, American Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1, March Issue 2010 (Click image to download article)

Hopi runner Philip Zeyouma’s trophy cups featured on cover of American Quarterly

Education beyond the Mesas: Hopi Students at Sherman Institute, 1902-1929 (University of Nebraska Press, 2010)

Education beyond the Mesas – Introduction (click image to download)

“‘The Hopi Followers’: Chief Tawaquaptewa and Hopi Student Advancement at Sherman Institute, 1906-1909”, Journal of American Indian Education, (Click image to download article)

The Indian School on Magnolia Avenue: Voices and Images From Sherman Institute (Oregon State University Press, 2012)

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Constitution and Bylaws of the Hopi Tribe (With all amendments, click to download)

Click to listen to KUYI On-Line

Matt’s Goodreads

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