Indigenous corn

This afternoon I took a break from grading final exams to check on our corn, which students from the University of Illinois planted last week. As many of you know, we are filming this corn for a film by Victor Masayesva, Jr. titled “Maize.”

When I arrived at the plot, I was glad to see that our corn was coming up.

The first photo is of Hopi sweet corn (twaktsi), and the second one shows Tzeltal corn (teosinte) of southern Mexico. They are planted next to each other.

I also added a few photos to give readers a sense of the plot and surrounding area.

Hopi sweet corn (twaktsi), photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert
Teosinte, Photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert
Photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert
Photograph by Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert

2 thoughts on “Indigenous corn

  1. Maize has an interesting world history. It’s one of the key crops in the development of ancient American societies and helped fuel the development of indigenous civilizations in the Western Hemisphere. It is truly an American-made product!

  2. I didn’t know any other way to share this link with you. It’s a link to my latest blog which is an original story which centers around the dream of a Grandmama in First Mesa and her storytelling Granddaughter and is about voting. I would appreciate it you shared it, and/or put me on your blogroll. I’m a storyteller and the blog has a link to the audio podcast as well as includes the written story. I will be posting more audio stories throughout the summer. Thanks.
    http://rigzenchomo.com/2012/05/11/american-pie-a-dream-for-the-usa/

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